Intermediate Algebra I

1. Prerequisite (Attach Enrollment Limitation Validation Form.)
Satisfactory completion of MATH 110 or 112 OR appropriate score on the College Placement Test and other measures as appropriate.

2. Corequisite (Attach Enrollment Limitation Validation Form.)
none

3. Recommended Preparation (Attach Enrollment Validation Form.)
MATH 115 and READ 830.

4. Catalog Description (Include prerequisites/corequisites/recommended preparation.)

INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA I, MATH 122
Three lecture hours plus one hour by arrangement.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of MATH 110 or 112 OR appropriate score on the College Placement Test and other measures as appropriate. Recommended Preparation: MATH 115 and READ 830.
A comprehensive review of elementary algebra with certain topics studied in greater depth. Extension of fundamental algebraic concepts and operations, problem solving and applications, linear and rational equations, equations in two variables, graphs, systems of equations.

5. Class Schedule Description (Include prerequisites/corequisites/recommended preparation.)

INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA, MATH 122
A comprehensive review of elementary algebra with certain topics studied in greater depth. Extension of fundamental algebraic concepts and operations, problem solving and applications, linear and rational equations, equations in two variables, graphs, systems of equations. Three lecture hours plus one hour by arrangement per week. Extra supplies may be required.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of MATH 110 or 112 OR appropriate score on the College Placement Test and other measures as appropriate. Recommended Preparation: MATH 115 and completion of READ 830 with a grade of C or higher and concurrent enrollment in READ 400 or 405 or appropriate skill level as indicated by the reading placement tests or other measures.

6. Course Objectives (Identify 5-8 expected learner outcomes using active verbs.)

Upon completion of this course the student should be able to:
A. Identify and apply basic algebraic concepts including domain, range, slope, absolute value, scientific notation, equivalent equations, laws of exponents, intercepts, parallel lines, perpendicular lines, horizontal lines, and vertical lines.
B. Solve systems of linear equations in three unknowns using elimination and substitution.
C. Solve equations and inequalities in one or two variables and involving absolute values.
D. Sketch the graphs of functions and relations.
E. Find and sketch inverse functions.
F. Problem solve by application of linear functions.
G. Apply linear functions.
H. Graph linear inequalities in two variables.

7. Course Content (Brief but complete topical outline of the course that includes major subject areas [1-2 pages]. Should reflect all course objectives listed above. In addition, you may attach a sample course syllabus with a timeline.)

1. Algebra and Problem Solving.
a. Some Basics of Algebra.
b. Operations and Properties of Real Numbers.
c. Solving Equations.
d. Introduction to Problem Solving.
e. Properties of Exponents; Scientific Notation.
2. Graphs, Functions, and Linear Equations.
a. Linear Functions: Graphs and Models.
b. Inverse Functions
3. Systems of Linear Equations
a. Solving by Substitution or Elimination.
b. Solving Applications: Systems of Two Equations.
c. Systems of Equations in Three Variables.
d. Solving Applications: Systems of Three Equations.
4. Inequalities
a. Inequalities.
b. Intersections, Unions, and Compound Inequalities.
c. Absolute-Value Equations and Inequalities.
d. Inequalities in Two Variables.
e. Applications
5. Polynomials and Polynomial Functions.
a. Polynomial operations.
b. Common Factors and Factoring by Grouping.
c. Factoring Trinomials.
d. Perfect-Square Trinomials, Differences of Squares, Sums or Differences of Cubes
e. Applications.
6. Rational Expressions, Equations, and Functions.
a. Rational Expressions: Multiplying and Dividing. Adding and Subtracting.
b. Complex Rational Expressions.
c. Rational Equations.
d. Solving Applications Using Rational Equations.
e. Rational Functions.
f. Division of Polynomials.
g. Formulas, Applications, and Variation.

8. Representative Instructional Methods (Describe instructor-initiated teaching strategies that will assist students in meeting course objectives. Include examples of out-of-class assignments, required reading and writing assignments, and methods for teaching critical thinking skills.)

a. Out-of-class assignments: students will need to complete assigned problems and projects.
b. Reading assignments: Instructor will assign text readings for discussion of a topic in class.
c. Writing assignments:
  1. Students will submit written homework assignments.
  2. Students may be assigned papers including mathematical modeling.
d. Critical thinking:
  1. Lecture/discussion to understand problem-solving process.
  2. Students will practice critical thinking in small group problem solving.
  3. Students will evaluate proposed solutions in light of constraints of the problem.
e. Resources available on CD and the Internet may be used to augment the text.

9. Representative Methods of Evaluation (Describe measurement of student progress toward course objectives. Courses with required writing component and/or problem-solving emphasis must reflect critical thinking component. If skills class, then applied skills.)

a. Written individual assignments and/or journal- to demonstrate individual student progress toward objectives.
b. Small group presentations- to demonstrate student participation in problem solving process.
c. Written exams/quizzes - to reflect student knowledge of vocabulary, concepts, and application of concepts to problem solving as presented in lectures and discussion, small group sessions, and text readings.
d. Final Examination - to reflect student knowledge of vocabulary, concepts, and applications of concepts to problem solving as presented in lectures and discussions, small group sessions, and text readings.
e. Participation - to reflect student involvement in class discussions, small group sessions and presentations, etc.

10. Representative Text Materials (With few exceptions, texts need to be current. Include publication dates.)

Texts similar to but not limited to:

Bittinger and Ellenbogen, Intermediate Algebra, Concepts and Applications, 7th ed.
Lehmann, Intermediate Algebra, Functions and Authentic Applications, 2nd ed.